1. A new take on Bond posters. Have you read Tina Rosenberg’s true-life spy tale?

    A new take on Bond posters. Have you read Tina Rosenberg’s true-life spy tale?

  2. 70 years ago today, the Allies invaded North Africa. Meet the spy writer who made sure Hitler didn’t see it coming, in Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Tina Rosenberg’s D for Deception. 

    70 years ago today, the Allies invaded North Africa. Meet the spy writer who made sure Hitler didn’t see it coming, in Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Tina Rosenberg’s D for Deception

  3. Which Bond wins for most martinis? Check out this graph and then look at our spy chart, with even more booze. 

    Which Bond wins for most martinis? Check out this graph and then look at our spy chart, with even more booze. 

  4. An exhibit of real props from a fake movie. 
Before Argo became a Ben Affleck film, it was a Wired story by Joshuah Bearman, author of Baghdad Country Club. 

    An exhibit of real props from a fake movie. 

    Before Argo became a Ben Affleck film, it was a Wired story by Joshuah Bearman, author of Baghdad Country Club

  5. Photos from our live radio performance for D for Deception. Radio Cabaret and Tina Rosenberg brought spy novelist Dennis Wheatley’s story to life, with Seth Kessel and the Two Cent Band setting the mood

  6. Sallust. Gregory Sallust.
Before there was James Bond, there was Gregory Sallust. Dennis Wheatley’s ruthless spy became active almost two decades before Ian Fleming published his first book. Daring, debonair, and ruthless, over the course of seven novels Sallust infiltrates the German military and saves Europe from Hitler. Wheatley stepped into the pages of his own fiction when he became a deception planner in Churchill’s bunker, channeling his flair for narrative into elaborate feints for the enemy, providing a path to victory for the Allies. Read all about it in our latest story, D for Deception.
Illustration by Camille Rogine

    Sallust. Gregory Sallust.

    Before there was James Bond, there was Gregory Sallust. Dennis Wheatley’s ruthless spy became active almost two decades before Ian Fleming published his first book. Daring, debonair, and ruthless, over the course of seven novels Sallust infiltrates the German military and saves Europe from Hitler. Wheatley stepped into the pages of his own fiction when he became a deception planner in Churchill’s bunker, channeling his flair for narrative into elaborate feints for the enemy, providing a path to victory for the Allies. Read all about it in our latest story, D for Deception.

    Illustration by Camille Rogine

  7. theatlantic:

The Man Who Won Normandy

By the time Franco consolidated his control of a unified Spain, Juan Pujol knew how to lie. He knew how to hide. He knew how to flee and connive and take measure of the men he encountered. He saw firsthand the cruelties of both the communists and the fascists. He had faced death and survived. In other words, he realized there was more to him than he thought possible. And when a conflict more terrible than civil war began to brew, the former deserter felt the call for service. In his own words when reflecting on Hitler: “I had the idea that this man was a demon, a man who could completely destroy humanity.” The only question was how the poultry salesman might best serve the effort. As it turned out, the very skills that kept him out of one war would make him a decisive force in another.
He became a spy. Not in the submit-a-résumé-and-wait kind of way, but rather, he simply decided that he was a spy and that was that.
Read more. [Image: The U.S. Army/Flickr]


Coming Soon: Our own World War II espionage tale!

    theatlantic:

    The Man Who Won Normandy

    By the time Franco consolidated his control of a unified Spain, Juan Pujol knew how to lie. He knew how to hide. He knew how to flee and connive and take measure of the men he encountered. He saw firsthand the cruelties of both the communists and the fascists. He had faced death and survived. In other words, he realized there was more to him than he thought possible. And when a conflict more terrible than civil war began to brew, the former deserter felt the call for service. In his own words when reflecting on Hitler: “I had the idea that this man was a demon, a man who could completely destroy humanity.” The only question was how the poultry salesman might best serve the effort. As it turned out, the very skills that kept him out of one war would make him a decisive force in another.

    He became a spy. Not in the submit-a-résumé-and-wait kind of way, but rather, he simply decided that he was a spy and that was that.

    Read more. [Image: The U.S. Army/Flickr]

    Coming Soon: Our own World War II espionage tale!