1. Introducing the Marketplace Reader! Built with Creatavist

  2. Now on Creatavist: “What Hadn’t Happened,” Erin Anderson’s audio story about a tragic family secret.  
Download the Creatavist app.

    Now on Creatavist: “What Hadn’t Happened,” Erin Anderson’s audio story about a tragic family secret.  

    Download the Creatavist app.

  3. The Wall Street Journal takes a look at our Creatavist platform, a.k.a. apps for everybody! 

    The Wall Street Journal takes a look at our Creatavist platform, a.k.a. apps for everybody! 

  4. We were at the New York Comics Symposium the other day, talking nonfiction comics, Stowaway, and Creatavist. 

    We were at the New York Comics Symposium the other day, talking nonfiction comics, Stowaway, and Creatavist

  5. Learn how to make multimedia comics with our Creatavist tool at the NY Comics and Picture-story Symposium TONIGHT 7 p.m. at Bluestockings Bookstore, 172 Allen Street, New York, NY. Open to the public ($5 suggested donation) 

    Learn how to make multimedia comics with our Creatavist tool at the NY Comics and Picture-story Symposium TONIGHT 7 p.m. at Bluestockings Bookstore, 172 Allen Street, New York, NY. Open to the public ($5 suggested donation) 

  6. theparisreview:

The original Paris Review website.

Now there’s an app! 

    theparisreview:

    The original Paris Review website.

    Now there’s an app

  7. Jörgits combines “whiz-bang multimedia and old-school textual immersion” in an interactive children’s novel. 

  8. theparisreview:

In 1955, The Paris Review paid a struggling Jack Kerouac fifty dollars for an excerpt from a then unpublished manuscript. The excerpt appeared as a short story titled “The Mexican Girl” and, after much acclaim, was picked up a year later by Martha Foley’s The Best American Short Stories. Due in large part to the success of “The Mexican Girl,” On the Road was soon accepted by Viking Press; the full novel was published in 1957.The issue containing Kerouac’s excerpt—The Paris Review No. 11 (Winter 1955)—has long since sold out, but we’re happy to announce that it’s now available in digital form via the Paris Review app.To find out how you can receive free digital access to this issue, click here.

    theparisreview:

    In 1955, The Paris Review paid a struggling Jack Kerouac fifty dollars for an excerpt from a then unpublished manuscript. The excerpt appeared as a short story titled “The Mexican Girl” and, after much acclaim, was picked up a year later by Martha Foley’s The Best American Short Stories. Due in large part to the success of “The Mexican Girl,” On the Road was soon accepted by Viking Press; the full novel was published in 1957.

    The issue containing Kerouac’s excerpt—The Paris Review No. 11 (Winter 1955)—has long since sold out, but we’re happy to announce that it’s now available in digital form via the Paris Review app.

    To find out how you can receive free digital access to this issue, click here.

  9. micropolisnyc:

    theparisreview:

    Checking out books on the subway? We can dig it! (And those bookshelf mock-ups would make a pleasant change from Dr. Zizmor ads, not that we don’t love him, too.)

    Brilliant idea, meant for anyone who’s been on a long subway ride with nothing to read. But as it turns out, this is just a concept, and the New York Public Library has nothing to do with it, despite their logo being front and center.

    The credit goes to students at the Miami Ad School. But the title of their project, “A Simple Solution to help New York’s Empty Libraries,” is flawed, because the libraries in this city aren’t empty at all.

    Since 2008, NYPL circulation is up 44 percent, to 28 million. Attendance is up 12 percent, to 18 million. And computer usage is up 160 percent.

    That said, Miami’s students are on to something here. NYPL, take note!

    If only this were REAL.  

  10. symboliamag:

Symbolia has arrived.
And we are so excited to share it with you. Symbolia mixes the best of comics art with thoughtful journalism from around the world.

Downloading this right now! 

    symboliamag:

    Symbolia has arrived.

    And we are so excited to share it with you. Symbolia mixes the best of comics art with thoughtful journalism from around the world.

    Downloading this right now!