1. theparisreview:

“At best you affect the consciousness of your time, and so indirectly you affect the history of the time which succeeds you. Of course, you need patience. It takes a long time for sentiments to collect into an action and often they never do. Which is why I was once so ready to conceive of running for mayor of New York. I wanted to make actions rather than effect sentiments. But I’ve come to the middle-aged conclusion that I’m probably better as a writer than a man of action.”
Norman Mailer/Jimmy Breslin Mayoral campaign poster.

    theparisreview:

    “At best you affect the consciousness of your time, and so indirectly you affect the history of the time which succeeds you. Of course, you need patience. It takes a long time for sentiments to collect into an action and often they never do. Which is why I was once so ready to conceive of running for mayor of New York. I wanted to make actions rather than effect sentiments. But I’ve come to the middle-aged conclusion that I’m probably better as a writer than a man of action.”

    Norman Mailer/Jimmy Breslin Mayoral campaign poster.

  2. theparisreview:

The original Paris Review website.

Now there’s an app! 

    theparisreview:

    The original Paris Review website.

    Now there’s an app

  3. theparisreview:

In 1955, The Paris Review paid a struggling Jack Kerouac fifty dollars for an excerpt from a then unpublished manuscript. The excerpt appeared as a short story titled “The Mexican Girl” and, after much acclaim, was picked up a year later by Martha Foley’s The Best American Short Stories. Due in large part to the success of “The Mexican Girl,” On the Road was soon accepted by Viking Press; the full novel was published in 1957.The issue containing Kerouac’s excerpt—The Paris Review No. 11 (Winter 1955)—has long since sold out, but we’re happy to announce that it’s now available in digital form via the Paris Review app.To find out how you can receive free digital access to this issue, click here.

    theparisreview:

    In 1955, The Paris Review paid a struggling Jack Kerouac fifty dollars for an excerpt from a then unpublished manuscript. The excerpt appeared as a short story titled “The Mexican Girl” and, after much acclaim, was picked up a year later by Martha Foley’s The Best American Short Stories. Due in large part to the success of “The Mexican Girl,” On the Road was soon accepted by Viking Press; the full novel was published in 1957.

    The issue containing Kerouac’s excerpt—The Paris Review No. 11 (Winter 1955)—has long since sold out, but we’re happy to announce that it’s now available in digital form via the Paris Review app.

    To find out how you can receive free digital access to this issue, click here.

  4. explore-blog:

    Gay Talese’s outline for the 1966 classic Frank Sinatra Has a Cold, one of the best long-form magazine pieces ever penned, written on a shirt board. 

    ( The Paris Review)

    Still not sure what a shirt board is…

  5. Introducing Storyvids, the literary equivalent of music videos. 

  6. The Paris Review talks with comics artist Gabrielle Bell about her work’s “nimble surrealism.” 
For more comics, read Stowaway on iPad and the Web! 

    The Paris Review talks with comics artist Gabrielle Bell about her work’s “nimble surrealism.” 

    For more comics, read Stowaway on iPad and the Web! 

  7. theparisreview:

As reported in The New York Times, we’re thrilled to announce the launch of our iPad/iPhone app! On it you’ll find new issues, rare back issues, and archival collections—along with our complete interview series and the Paris Review Daily. And if you download the app by October 21, you’ll receive the current issue, along with an archival issue—Spring 1958, featuring an interview with Ernest Hemingway, early fiction by Philip Roth, and a portfolio by Alberto Giacometti—for free!
Read more here.

    theparisreview:

    As reported in The New York Times, we’re thrilled to announce the launch of our iPad/iPhone app! On it you’ll find new issues, rare back issues, and archival collections—along with our complete interview series and the Paris Review Daily. And if you download the app by October 21, you’ll receive the current issue, along with an archival issue—Spring 1958, featuring an interview with Ernest Hemingway, early fiction by Philip Roth, and a portfolio by Alberto Giacometti—for free!

    Read more here.

  8. During Literary Death Match NYC, Episode 43 at Le Poisson Rouge, D For Deception author Tina Rosenberg gave an admirable performance, channeling Wheatley character greats SS Gruppenführer Grauber and Erika von Epp and breaking into song in front of a captive audience and three judges. 

    “I found it fascinating.” - Author Jon Ronson, judging Literary Merit

    “A great strength and power in the way you read… a great vocal attack to the whole thing. It was very alive…SINGING! You were really living in the words and making music out of the words and it took me right there.” - Author and cultural critic Touré, judging Performance

    “I would have paid attention in school if you were my teacher.” - Comedian Jamie Lee, judging Intangibles

    Despite Rosenberg’s electrifying performance, victory went to her talented Round Two contender Courtney Maum. Maum then joined Round One winner Jason Diamond (who beat Matt Sumell) in a tense final round, in which they were blindfolded and tasked with pinning a moustache onto a giant portrait of Ernest Hemingway. Rosenberg was not sad to miss that particular aspect of the evening. 

  9. I realized I was on to something: maybe we can have some fun with this journalism.

    — Hunter S. Thompson in The Paris Review

  10. The trailer for a new feature length documentary about George Plimpton.