1. “You want to throw yourself in places people have never been.”

    Listen to New Yorker writer Nicholas Schmidle on the Longform podcast. 

  2. "TV deserves to have the kind of criticism that expects it to be great."

    Emily Nussbaum, television critic at The New Yorker.

  3. Meet The Brooklynite, a rare Art Deco magazine that (not so subtly) patterned itself on The New Yorker. 

    Meet The Brooklynite, a rare Art Deco magazine that (not so subtly) patterned itself on The New Yorker

  4. newyorker:

This week’s Anniversary-issue cover, “Brooklyn’s Eustace,” is by Simon Greiner, a thirty-one-year-old reader from Sydney, Australia, who submitted it through our 2013 Eustace Tilley Contest. Here, Greiner talks about the inspiration for his cover, plus see a slideshow of all of the 2013 Eustace Tilley finalists: http://nyr.kr/VyjBCX

B.R.O.O.K.L.Y.N.

    newyorker:

    This week’s Anniversary-issue cover, “Brooklyn’s Eustace,” is by Simon Greiner, a thirty-one-year-old reader from Sydney, Australia, who submitted it through our 2013 Eustace Tilley Contest. Here, Greiner talks about the inspiration for his cover, plus see a slideshow of all of the 2013 Eustace Tilley finalists: http://nyr.kr/VyjBCX

    B.R.O.O.K.L.Y.N.

  5. The New Yorker’s Patrick Radden Keefe and David Grann on what makes nonfiction crime stories so powerful. 

  6. longformpodcast:

    Episode 15: Jonah Weiner

    Jonah Weiner, contributing editor at Rolling Stone, pop critic at Slate, and contributor to The New York Times Magazine and The New Yorker, interviewed by Aaron Lammer.

    “The thing that I’ve found useful is really actually to delete everything that I’ve written and go at it fresh, and re-envision it again: this is going to be my new lede now. That’s really the best way to do it, because if there are these vestigial sentences, and vestigial sequences or paragraphs that are in the draft, for me, that’s just going to snap me back to where my head was at, in an unproductive way… Often, I’ll find that that is just this great cure-all. Just delete it all, go for a walk or whatever, and then sit down and start writing an entirely different feature about the exact same subject.”

    Thanks to TinyLetter for sponsoring this week’s episode!

    Don’t miss Jonah Weiner’s New Yorker profile of the photographer who’s turned documenting drones into high art. 

  7. A video tour of Gay Talese’s writing bunker. 

  8. For confidential informants, leniency comes with a price. (Listen to the podcast.)

    For confidential informants, leniency comes with a price. (Listen to the podcast.)

  9. longformpodcast:

    Episode 3: David Grann

    David Grann, staff writer at The New Yorker, talks with Max Linsky. 

    “You don’t always know all the answers. I think that’s what kinda makes life interesting. The thing that makes these stories real, while they are in some ways unfathomable, [is that] there’s an uneasiness of certitude. Because there are things that are not always known, there are elements of doubt, and that can be very haunting.”

  10. Mark Singer and David Grann on the art of writing about mysterious characters. (Don’t miss Grann’s masterful story The Chameleon, about a French impostor.)